The Next Wonder – MBSE/MBE: From Ideas to “Making Products and Services”

The Next Wonder – MBSE/MBE: From Ideas to “Making Products and Services”

Title : The Next Wonder - MBSE/MBE: From Ideas to "Making Products and Services"
Authors :
Baras, John, S.
Conference : 21st IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation
Date: September 06 - September 09, 2016

Advances in Information Technology have enabled the design of complex engineerd systems, with large number of heterogeneous components and capable of multiple complex functions, leading to the ubiquitious cyber-physical systems (CPS). These advances have at the same time increased the capabilities of such systems and have increased their complexity  to such an extent that systematic design towards predictable performance is extremely  challenging, if not infeasible with the current methodologies and tools. We first describe a rigorous framework we are developing for model-based systems engineering (MBSE), s system level deisgn methodology that addresses these challenges, which also incorporates manufacturing, operation and life cylce considerations. We describe the three fundemental components for MBSE within our framework: (a) An integrated systems modeling hub built around SysML, employing meta-modeling and tools; (b) Linking this modelling hub with tradeoff analysis tools for design space exploration, employing linkage with the parametric and requirements  diagram of SysML, and integrated methods and tools from multi-criteria  mixed ( integer and numerical variables and metrics) optimization and constrained based reasoning; (c) Representation and management of requirements, employing initial efforts towards an integration of methods  and tools from model checking, contract based  design and automatic theorem proving, and including finite time temporal logic  specifications for system behaviour. We describe  our results for conquering and managing the complexity of queries in design, manufacturing and operational space exploration. We provide a short description  of such complex systems, a subject of rapindly increasing importance in view paradigms. We next describe applications of the framework to several important  current  technological problems ( several major domains of CPS): power grids, automotive, aerospcae, energy efficient buildings, sensor and communication networks, smart manufacturing, robotics and UAV, health care, cyber-security. We close with a description of what is still lacking , research challenges and future promising research directions.